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Washington Treatment Centers

Camas Path BHS (Kalispel Tribe of Indians)


Camas Path BHS (Kalispel Tribe of Indians) in Airway Heights, Washington is an alcohol treatment program focusing on a health and substance abuse services mix. Providing substance abuse treatment with outpatient care. Adolecents or teens, dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders, pregnant or postpartum women, women, DUI or DWI offenders, and criminal justice clients are supported for drug rehab. State financed payment, private health insurance, self payment, and access to recovery voucher is accepted with sliding fee scales. Includes ASL or other assistance for the hearing impaired and spanish language services.

Facility Location:
934 South Garfield Road, Airway Heights,washington, 99001, USA
Mailing Address:
934 South Garfield Road, Airway Heights,WA, 99001, USA
Phone Number:
(509) 456-0799
Intake Number:
(509) 789-7630
Hotline:
(509) 671-0383
Website
www.camasinstitute.com
Primary Focus
Mix of mental health and substance abuse services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment
Type of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Access to Recovery
Payment Assistance
Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)
Special Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, Cree, Ojibwa, Salish, Spanish

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Drug Facts


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  • The National Institutes of Health suggests, the vast majority of people who commit crimes have problems with drugs or alcohol, and locking them up without trying to address those problems would be a waste of money.
  • LSD can stay in one's system from a few hours to five days.
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  • There are programs for alcohol addiction.
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  • Interventions can facilitate the development of healthy interpersonal relationships and improve the participant's ability to interact with family, peers, and others in the community.
  • Younger war veterans (ages 18-25) have a higher likelihood of succumbing to a drug or alcohol addiction.
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