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Drug Rehab Treatment Centers

New-mexico Treatment Centers

Residential long-term drug treatment in New-mexico


There are a total of 0 drug treatment centers listed under the category Residential long-term drug treatment in new-mexico. If you have a facility that is part of the Residential long-term drug treatment category you can contact us to share it on our website. Additional information about these listings in New-mexico is available by phoning our toll free rehab helpline at 866-720-3784.

Rehabilitation Categories


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Drug Facts


  • Substance Use Treatment at a Specialty Facility: Treatment received at a hospital (inpatient only), rehabilitation facility (inpatient or outpatient), or mental health center to reduce alcohol use, or to address medical problems associated with alcohol use.
  • Nearly 500,000 people each year abuse prescription medications for the first time.
  • Adderall is a Schedule II controlled substance, meaning that it has a high potential for addiction.
  • The United States represents 5% of the world's population and 75% of prescription drugs taken. 60% of teens who abuse prescription drugs get them free from friends and relatives.
  • Crack is heated and smoked. It is so named because it makes a cracking or popping sound when heated.
  • Rohypnol causes a person to black out or forget what happened to them.
  • Methadone can stay in a person's system for 1- 14 days.
  • LSD disrupts the normal functioning of the brain, making you see images, hear sounds and feel sensations that seem real but aren't.
  • Methadone is a synthetic opioid analgesic (painkiller) used to treat chronic pain.
  • Two-thirds of people 12 and older (68%) who have abused prescription pain relievers within the past year say they got them from a friend or relative.1
  • The most commonly abused prescription drugs are pain medications, sleeping pills, anti-anxiety medications and stimulants (used to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders).1
  • Two thirds of teens who abuse prescription pain relievers got them from family or friends, often without their knowledge, such as stealing them from the medicine cabinet.
  • Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent.
  • Because of the tweaker's unpredictability, there have been reports that they can react violently, which can lead to involvement in domestic disputes, spur-of-the-moment crimes, or motor vehicle accidents.
  • Anti-Depressants are often combined with Alcohol, which increases the risk of poisoning and overdose.
  • Depressants are widely used to relieve stress, induce sleep and relieve anxiety.
  • Hallucinogen rates have risen by over 30% over the past twenty years.
  • Powder cocaine is a hydrochloride salt derived from processed extracts of the leaves of the coca plant. 'Crack' is a type of processed cocaine that is formed into a rock-like crystal.
  • Narcotics are sometimes necessary to treat both psychological and physical ailments but the use of any narcotic can become habitual or a dependency.
  • Over the past 15 years, treatment for addiction to prescription medication has grown by 300%.

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