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Georgia Treatment Centers

Floyd Behavioral Health Center (Rome)


Floyd Behavioral Health Center (Rome) in Rome, Georgia is an alcohol treatment program focusing on a health and substance abuse services mix. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with outpatient care, partial hospitalization or day treatment, and hospitalization or inpatient care. Seniors or older adults are supported for drug rehab. Medicaid, medicare, state financed payment, private health insurance, military insurance, and self payment is accepted.

Facility Location:
306 Shorter Avenue, Rome,georgia, 30165, USA
Mailing Address:
306 Shorter Avenue, Rome,GA, 30165, USA
Phone Number:
(706) 509-3500
Hotline:
(706) 509-3500
Website
www.floyd.org
Primary Focus
Mix of mental health and substance abuse services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Hospital inpatient, Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment
Special Programs/Groups
Seniors/older adults
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services:
Not Available

Facility Map:


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Drug Facts


  • Ironically, young teens in small towns are more likely to use crystal meth than teens raised in the city.
  • Meth can lead to your body overheating, to convulsions and to comas, eventually killing you.
  • In Utah, more than 95,000 adults and youths need substance-abuse treatment services, according to the Utah Division of Substance and Mental Health 2007 annual report.
  • In Hamilton County, 7,300 people were served by street outreach, emergency shelter and transitional housing programs in 2007, according to the Cincinnati/Hamilton County Continuum of Care for the Homeless.
  • Alcohol affects the central nervous system, thereby controlling all bodily functions.
  • Methamphetamine can be detected for 2-4 days in a person's system.
  • Meth causes severe paranoia episodes such as hallucinations and delusions.
  • Marijuana is just as damaging to the lungs and airway as cigarettes are, leading to bronchitis, emphysema and even cancer.
  • Veterans who fought in combat had higher risk of becoming addicted to drugs or becoming alcoholics than veterans who did not see combat.
  • Marijuana is also known as cannabis because of the plant it comes from.
  • Methamphetamine blocks dopamine re-uptake, methamphetamine also increases the release of dopamine, leading to much higher concentrations in the synapse, which can be toxic to nerve terminals.
  • One oxycodone pill can cost $80 on the street, compared to $3 to $5 for a bag of heroin. As addiction intensifies, many users end up turning to heroin.
  • Opiates are medicines made from opium, which occurs naturally in poppy plants.
  • Believe it or not, marijuana is NOT a medicine.
  • Since 2000, non-illicit drugs such as oxycodone, fentanyl and methadone contribute more to overdose fatalities in Utah than illicit drugs such as heroin.
  • Fewer than one out of ten North Carolinian's who use illegal drugs, and only one of 20 with alcohol problems, get state funded help, and the treatment they do receive is out of date and inadequate.
  • Marijuana can stay in a person's system for 3-5 days, however, if you are a heavy user, it can be detected up to 30 days.
  • Women abuse alcohol and drugs for different reasons than men do.
  • Those who complete prison-based treatment and continue with treatment in the community have the best outcomes.
  • Over the past 15 years, treatment for addiction to prescription medication has grown by 300%.

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