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Bournewood Hospital (Chestnut Hill)


Bournewood Hospital (Chestnut Hill) in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts is an alcohol rehab program focusing on mental health services. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, methadone maintenance, methadone detox, and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with outpatient care, partial hospitalization or day treatment, residential short-term treatment, and hospitalization or inpatient care. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, medicare, state financed payment, private health insurance, military insurance, and self payment is accepted. Includes spanish language services.

Facility Location:
300 South Street, Chestnut Hill,massachusetts, 2467, USA
Mailing Address:
300 South Street, Chestnut Hill,MA, 2467, USA
Phone Number:
(617) 469-0300x3
Intake Number:
(800) 468-4358
(617) 469-0300x3
Primary Focus
Mental health services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Hospital inpatient, Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services
Polish, Russian, Spanish

Facility Map:

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Drug Facts

  • Women abuse alcohol and drugs for different reasons than men do.
  • Predatory drugs are drugs used to gain sexual advantage over the victim they include: Rohypnol (date rape drug), GHB and Ketamine.
  • In Connecticut overdoses have claimed at least eight lives of high school and college-age students in communities large and small in 2008.
  • PCP (also known as angel dust) can cause drug addiction in the infant as well as tremors.
  • Cocaine only has an effect on a person for about an hour, which will lead a person to have to use cocaine many times through out the day.
  • Oxycontin is know on the street as the hillbilly heroin.
  • Alcohol can stay in one's system from one to twelve hours.
  • Crack cocaine gets its name from how it breaks into little rocks after being produced.
  • Second hand smoke can kill you. In the U.S. alone over 3,000 people die every year from cancer caused by second hand smoke.
  • Hallucinogens do not always produce hallucinations.
  • Out of every 100 people who try, only between 5 and 10 will actually be able to stop smoking on their own.
  • Rohypnol (The Date Rape Drug) is more commonly known as "roofies".
  • There are innocent people behind bars because of the drug conspiracy laws.
  • Teens who have open communication with their parents are half as likely to try drugs, yet only a quarter of adolescents state that they have had conversations with their parents regarding drugs.
  • Men and women who suddenly stop drinking can have severe withdrawal symptoms.
  • Ecstasy can cause you to dehydrate.
  • Alcohol is a drug because of its intoxicating effect but it is widely accepted socially.
  • More than fourty percent of people who begin drinking before age 15 eventually become alcoholics.
  • The National Institute of Justice research shows that, compared with traditional criminal justice strategies, drug treatment and other costs came to about $1,400 per drug court participant, saving the government about $6,700 on average per participant.
  • Ketamine is actually a tranquilizer most commonly used in veterinary practice on animals.

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