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Massachusetts Treatment Centers

Bournewood Hospital (Chestnut Hill)


Bournewood Hospital (Chestnut Hill) in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts is an alcohol rehab program focusing on mental health services. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, methadone maintenance, methadone detox, and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with outpatient care, partial hospitalization or day treatment, residential short-term treatment, and hospitalization or inpatient care. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, medicare, state financed payment, private health insurance, military insurance, and self payment is accepted. Includes spanish language services.

Facility Location:
300 South Street, Chestnut Hill,massachusetts, 2467, USA
Mailing Address:
300 South Street, Chestnut Hill,MA, 2467, USA
Phone Number:
(617) 469-0300x3
Intake Number:
(800) 468-4358
(617) 469-0300x3
Website
www.bournewood.com
Primary Focus
Mental health services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Hospital inpatient, Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services
Polish, Russian, Spanish

Facility Map:


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Drug Facts


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  • Narcotics used illegally is the definition of drug abuse.
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  • Barbiturates have been used for depression and even by vets for animal anesthesia yet people take them in order to relax and for insomnia.
  • Children, innocent drivers, families, the environment, all are affected by drug addiction even if they have never taken a drink or tried a drug.
  • Cocaine can be snorted, injected, sniffed or smoked.
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  • Since 2000, non-illicit drugs such as oxycodone, fentanyl and methadone contribute more to overdose fatalities in Utah than illicit drugs such as heroin.

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