Toll Free Assessment
866-720-3784
Drug Rehab Treatment Centers

Vermont Treatment Centers

Residential short-term drug treatment in Vermont


There are a total of 6 drug treatment centers listed under the category Residential short-term drug treatment in vermont. If you have a facility that is part of the Residential short-term drug treatment category you can contact us to share it on our website. Additional information about these listings in Vermont is available by phoning our toll free rehab helpline at 866-720-3784.

Rehabilitation Categories


We have carefully sorted the 6 drug rehab centers in vermont. Filter your search for a treatment program or facility with specific categories. You may also find a resource using our addiction treatment search. For additional information on vermont drug rehab please phone our toll free helpline.

Drug Facts


  • Deaths from Alcohol poisoning are most common among the ages 35-64.
  • 30,000 people may depend on over the counter drugs containing codeine, with middle-aged women most at risk, showing that "addiction to over-the-counter painkillers is becoming a serious problem.
  • High doses of Ritalin lead to similar symptoms such as other stimulant abuse, including tremors and muscle twitching, paranoia, and a sensation of bugs or worms crawling under the skin.
  • In 2012, nearly 2.5 million individuals abused prescription drugs for the first time.
  • People who inject drugs such as heroin are at high risk of contracting the HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) virus.
  • Methamphetamine increases the amount of the neurotransmitter dopamine, leading to high levels of that chemical in the brain.
  • 7.6% of teens use the prescription drug Aderall.
  • Prescription painkillers are powerful drugs that interfere with the nervous system's transmission of the nerve signals we perceive as pain.
  • The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimated the worldwide production of amphetamine-type stimulants, which includes methamphetamine, at nearly 500 metric tons a year, with 24.7 million abusers.
  • Ritalin is the common name for methylphenidate, classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration as a Schedule II narcoticthe same classification as cocaine, morphine and amphetamines.
  • 4.4 million teenagers (aged 12 to 17) in the US admitted to taking prescription painkillers, and 2.3 million took a prescription stimulant such as Ritalin.
  • One in five teens (20%) who have abused prescription drugs did so before the age of 14.2
  • The most commonly abused prescription drugs are pain medications, sleeping pills, anti-anxiety medications and stimulants (used to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders).1
  • Many smokers say they have trouble cutting down on the amount of cigarettes they smoke. This is a sign of addiction.
  • 1 in 5 adolescents have admitted to using tranquilizers for nonmedical purposes.
  • The high potency of fentanyl greatly increases risk of overdose.
  • Heroin is usually injected into a vein, but it's also smoked ('chasing the dragon'), and added to cigarettes and cannabis. The effects are usually felt straightaway. Sometimes heroin is snorted the effects take around 10 to 15 minutes to feel if it's used in this way.
  • Crack users may experience severe respiratory problems, including coughing, shortness of breath, lung damage and bleeding.
  • Drug abuse and addiction changes your brain chemistry. The longer you use your drug of choice, the more damage is done and the harder it is to go back to 'normal' during drug rehab.
  • Authority receive over 10,500 reports of clonazepam abuse every year, and the rate is increasing.

Free non-judgmental advice at

866-720-3784