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Drug Rehab Treatment Centers

Georgia Treatment Centers

Floyd Behavioral Health Center (Rome)


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Floyd Behavioral Health Center (Rome) in Rome, Georgia is an alcohol treatment program focusing on a health and substance abuse services mix. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with outpatient care, partial hospitalization or day treatment, and hospitalization or inpatient care. Seniors or older adults are supported for drug rehab. Medicaid, medicare, state financed payment, private health insurance, military insurance, and self payment is accepted.

Facility Location:
306 Shorter Avenue, Rome, georgia, 30165, USA
Mailing Address:
306 Shorter Avenue, Rome, GA, 30165, USA
Phone Number:
(706) 509-3500
Hotline:
(706) 509-3500
Website
www.floyd.org
Primary Focus
Mix of mental health and substance abuse services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Hospital inpatient, Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment
Special Programs/Groups
Seniors/older adults
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services:
Not Available

Facility Map:


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We have carefully sorted the 533 drug rehab centers in georgia. Filter your search for a treatment program or facility with specific categories. You may also find a resource using our addiction treatment search. For additional information on georgia drug rehab please phone our toll free helpline.

Drug Facts


  • Gangs, whether street gangs, outlaw motorcycle gangs or even prison gangs, distribute more drugs on the streets of the U.S. than any other person or persons do.
  • There is holistic rehab, or natural, as opposed to traditional programs which may use drugs to treat addiction.
  • Many veterans who are diagnosed with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) drink or abuse drugs.
  • Prescription medications are legal drugs.
  • In Arizona during the year 2006 a total of 23,656 people were admitted to addiction treatment programs.
  • Selling and sharing prescription drugs is not legal.
  • Methadone is commonly used in the withdrawal phase from heroin.
  • These days, taking pills is acceptable: there is the feeling that there is a "pill for everything".
  • Ketamine is popular at dance clubs and "raves", unfortunately, some people (usually female) are not aware they have been dosed.
  • Valium is a drug that is used to manage anxiety disorders.
  • Crystal meth is a stimulant that can be smoked, snorted, swallowed or injected.
  • Men and women who suddenly stop drinking can have severe withdrawal symptoms.
  • In 2007, methamphetamine lab seizures increased slightly in California, but remained considerably low compared to years past.
  • At least half of the suspects arrested for murder and assault were under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • New scientific research has taught us that the brain doesn't finish developing until the mid-20s, especially the region that controls impulse and judgment.
  • There is inpatient treatment and outpatient.
  • Believe it or not, marijuana is NOT a medicine.
  • Fewer than one out of ten North Carolinian's who use illegal drugs, and only one of 20 with alcohol problems, get state funded help, and the treatment they do receive is out of date and inadequate.
  • The effects of heroin can last three to four hours.
  • The generic form of Oxycontin poses a bigger threat to those who abuse it, raising the number of poison control center calls remarkably.

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