Toll Free Assessment
866-720-3784
Drug Rehab Treatment Centers

Washington Treatment Centers

Camas Path BHS (Kalispel Tribe of Indians)


1-866-720-3784

Camas Path BHS (Kalispel Tribe of Indians) in Airway Heights, Washington is an alcohol treatment program focusing on a health and substance abuse services mix. Providing substance abuse treatment with outpatient care. Adolecents or teens, dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders, pregnant or postpartum women, women, DUI or DWI offenders, and criminal justice clients are supported for drug rehab. State financed payment, private health insurance, self payment, and access to recovery voucher is accepted with sliding fee scales. Includes ASL or other assistance for the hearing impaired and spanish language services.

Facility Location:
934 South Garfield Road, Airway Heights, washington, 99001, USA
Mailing Address:
934 South Garfield Road, Airway Heights, WA, 99001, USA
Phone Number:
(509) 456-0799
Intake Number:
(509) 789-7630
Hotline:
(509) 671-0383
Website
www.camasinstitute.com
Primary Focus
Mix of mental health and substance abuse services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment
Type of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Access to Recovery
Payment Assistance
Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)
Special Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, Cree, Ojibwa, Salish, Spanish

Facility Map:


  Share This Facility

Rehabilitation Categories


We have carefully sorted the 881 drug rehab centers in washington. Filter your search for a treatment program or facility with specific categories. You may also find a resource using our addiction treatment search. For additional information on washington drug rehab please phone our toll free helpline.

Drug Facts


  • Drugs are divided into several groups, depending on how they are used.
  • Barbiturates can stay in one's system for 2-3 days.
  • Approximately 1.3 million people in Utah reported Methamphetamine use in the past year, and 512,000 reported current or use within in the past month.
  • Narcotics is the legal term for mood altering drugs.
  • In 2008, the Thurston County Narcotics Task Force seized about 700 Oxycontin tablets that had been diverted for illegal use, said task force commander Lt. Lorelei Thompson.
  • Anorectic drugs can cause heart problems leading to cardiac arrest in young people.
  • Barbiturates have been used for depression and even by vets for animal anesthesia yet people take them in order to relax and for insomnia.
  • Drugs and alcohol do not discriminate no matter what your gender, race, age or political affiliation addiction can affect you if you let it.
  • Women are at a higher risk than men for liver damage, brain damage and heart damage due to alcohol intake.
  • Anorectic drugs have increased in order to suppress appetites, especially among teenage girls and models.
  • Drug use can interfere with the healthy birth of a baby.
  • Marijuana can stay in a person's system for 3-5 days, however, if you are a heavy user, it can be detected up to 30 days.
  • Street gang members primarily turn cocaine into crack cocaine.
  • These days, taking pills is acceptable: there is the feeling that there is a "pill for everything".
  • Those who complete prison-based treatment and continue with treatment in the community have the best outcomes.
  • Abused by an estimated one in five teens, prescription drugs are second only to alcohol and marijuana as the substances they use to get high.
  • More than 29% of teens in treatment are there because of an addiction to prescription medication.
  • Narcotics are used for pain relief, medical conditions and illnesses.
  • Cocaine is one of the most dangerous and potent drugs, with the great potential of causing seizures and heart-related injuries such as stopping the heart, whether one is a short term or long term user.
  • Flashbacks can occur in people who have abused hallucinogens even months after they stop taking them.

Free non-judgmental advice at

866-720-3784