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McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr (Substance Abuse Treatment Program)


1-866-720-3784

McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr (Substance Abuse Treatment Program) in Richmond, Virginia is an alcohol rehab program focusing on substance abuse treatment services. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, methadone maintenance, a halfway house or sober living home, and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with outpatient care and residential long-term treatment. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, medicare, private health insurance, and military insurance is accepted.

Facility Location:
Box 116 A Dept of Psychiatry, Richmond,virginia, 23249, USA
1201 Broad Rock Boulevard
Mailing Address:
1201 Broad Rock Boulevard, Richmond,VA, 23249, USA
Phone Number:
(804) 675-5000x5
Intake Number:
(804) 675-5000x5
Website
None
Primary Focus
Substance abuse treatment services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Halfway house, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days), Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders
Forms of Payment Accepted
Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services:
Not Available

Facility Map:


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Drug Facts


  • Drug conspiracy laws were set up to win the war on drugs.
  • Stimulants when abused lead to a "rush" feeling.
  • Methamphetamine can cause rapid heart rate, increased blood pressure, elevated body temperature and convulsions.
  • Teens who have open communication with their parents are half as likely to try drugs, yet only a quarter of adolescents state that they have had conversations with their parents regarding drugs.
  • Gangs, whether street gangs, outlaw motorcycle gangs or even prison gangs, distribute more drugs on the streets of the U.S. than any other person or persons do.
  • Interventions can facilitate the development of healthy interpersonal relationships and improve the participant's ability to interact with family, peers, and others in the community.
  • Codeine is widely used in the U.S. by prescription and over the counter for use as a pain reliever and cough suppressant.
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  • Narcotics used illegally is the definition of drug abuse.
  • Ecstasy causes hypothermia, which leads to muscle breakdown and could cause kidney failure.
  • In treatment, the drug abuser is taught to break old patterns of behavior, action and thinking. All While learning new skills for avoiding drug use and criminal behavior.
  • Alcohol can stay in one's system from one to twelve hours.
  • The New Hampshire Department of Corrections reports 85 percent of inmates arrive at the state prison with a history of substance abuse.
  • Stimulants are prescribed in the treatment of obesity.
  • Meth can lead to your body overheating, to convulsions and to comas, eventually killing you.
  • Cocaine is one of the most dangerous and potent drugs, with the great potential of causing seizures and heart-related injuries such as stopping the heart, whether one is a short term or long term user.
  • At least half of the suspects arrested for murder and assault were under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • When a person uses cocaine there are five new neural pathways created in the brain directly associated with addiction.
  • Narcotics are used for pain relief, medical conditions and illnesses.
  • Since 2000, non-illicit drugs such as oxycodone, fentanyl and methadone contribute more to overdose fatalities in Utah than illicit drugs such as heroin.

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