Drug And Alcohol Rehab Headquarters
Toll Free Assessment
Drug Rehab Treatment Centers

Oregon Treatment Centers

CODA Inc (Gresham Recovery Center)


CODA Inc (Gresham Recovery Center) in Portland, Oregon is a drug rehab program focusing on substance abuse treatment services. Providing substance abuse treatment and detoxification with outpatient care, residential short-term treatment, and residential long-term treatment. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders, pregnant or postpartum women, women, beds for children of the client, men, DUI or DWI offenders, and criminal justice clients are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, state financed payment, private health insurance, and self payment is accepted. Includes ASL or other assistance for the hearing impaired.

Facility Location:
1427 SE 182nd Avenue, Portland,oregon, 97233, USA
Mailing Address:
1427 SE 182nd Avenue, Portland,OR, 97233, USA
Phone Number:
(503) 761-6006
Primary Focus
Substance abuse treatment services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification
Type of Care
Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days), Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Residential beds for clients' children, Men, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Facility Map:

  Share This Facility

Rehabilitation Categories

We have carefully sorted the 212 drug rehab centers in oregon. Filter your search for a treatment program or facility with specific categories. You may also find a resource using our addiction treatment search. For additional information on oregon drug rehab please phone our toll free helpline.

Drug Facts

  • In the past 15 years, abuse of prescription drugs, including powerful opioid painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, has risen alarmingly among all ages, growing fastest among college-age adults, who lead all age groups in the misuse of medications.
  • Two thirds of the people who abuse drugs or alcohol admit to being sexually molested when they were children.
  • Meth causes severe paranoia episodes such as hallucinations and delusions.
  • Ecstasy can cause you to dehydrate.
  • Women who abuse drugs are more prone to sexually transmitted diseases and mental health problems such as depression.
  • Steroids are often abused by those who want to build muscle mass.
  • Cocaine comes from the South America coca plant.
  • 10 to 22% of automobile accidents involve drivers who are using drugs.
  • Babies can be born addicted to drugs.
  • In 2007, methamphetamine lab seizures increased slightly in California, but remained considerably low compared to years past.
  • Interventions can facilitate the development of healthy interpersonal relationships and improve the participant's ability to interact with family, peers, and others in the community.
  • There are innocent people behind bars because of the drug conspiracy laws.
  • In Utah, more than 95,000 adults and youths need substance-abuse treatment services, according to the Utah Division of Substance and Mental Health 2007 annual report.
  • Approximately 1.3 million people in Utah reported Methamphetamine use in the past year, and 512,000 reported current or use within in the past month.
  • Alcohol kills more young people than all other drugs combined.
  • Women in college who drank experienced higher levels of sexual aggression acts from men.
  • Oxycontin is a prescription pain reliever that can often be used unnecessarily or abused.
  • Many smokers say they have trouble cutting down on the amount of cigarettes they smoke. This is a sign of addiction.
  • Methadone can stay in a person's system for 1- 14 days.
  • Steroids can stay in one's system for three weeks if taken orally and up to 3-6 months if injected.

Free non-judgmental advice at