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North-carolina Treatment Centers

Roxie Avenue Center (Substance Abuse Services)


Roxie Avenue Center (Substance Abuse Services) in Fayetteville, North Carolina is a drug rehab facility focusing on a health and substance abuse services mix. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, and a halfway house or sober living home with outpatient care and residential short-term treatment. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, medicare, state financed payment, and self payment is accepted with sliding fee scales and payment assistance. Includes ASL or other assistance for the hearing impaired.

Facility Location:
1724 Roxie Avenue, Fayetteville,north-carolina, 28304, USA
Mailing Address:
1724 Roxie Avenue, Fayetteville,NC, 28304, USA
Phone Number:
(910) 484-1212
Intake Number:
(910) 484-1212x0
Website
www.ccmentalhealth.org
Primary Focus
Mix of mental health and substance abuse services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Halfway house
Type of Care
Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid)
Payment Assistance
Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)
Special Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

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Drug Facts


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