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Maryland Treatment Centers

A F Whitsitt Center (Chestertown)


A F Whitsitt Center (Chestertown) in Chestertown, Maryland is a drug rehab facility focusing on substance abuse treatment services. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with hospitalization or inpatient care. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders, women, and men are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, state financed payment, private health insurance, and self payment is accepted with sliding fee scales. Includes ASL or other assistance for the hearing impaired.

Facility Location:
300 Scheeler Road, Chestertown,maryland, 21620, USA
P.O. Box 229
Mailing Address:
300 Scheeler Road, Chestertown,MD, 21620, USA
Phone Number:
(410) 778-6404x3
Intake Number:
(410) 778-6404x3
(410) 778-6404x4
Website
www.kenthd.org/
Primary Focus
Substance abuse treatment services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Hospital inpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, Men
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance
Payment Assistance
Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)
Special Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Facility Map:


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Drug Facts


  • Smoking crack cocaine can lead to sudden death by means of a heart attack or stroke right then.
  • In the year 2006 a total of 13,693 people were admitted to Drug rehab or Alcohol rehab programs in Arkansas.
  • War veterans often turn to drugs and alcohol to forget what they went through during combat.
  • In treatment, the drug abuser is taught to break old patterns of behavior, action and thinking. All While learning new skills for avoiding drug use and criminal behavior.
  • Narcotics used illegally is the definition of drug abuse.
  • Two thirds of teens who abuse prescription pain relievers got them from family or friends, often without their knowledge, such as stealing them from the medicine cabinet.
  • Steroids can stop growth prematurely and permanently in teenagers who take them.
  • Currently 7.1 million adults, over 2 percent of the population in the U.S. are locked up or on probation; about half of those suffer from some kind of addiction to heroin, alcohol, crack, crystal meth, or some other drug but only 20 percent of those addicts actually get effective treatment as a result of their involvement with the judicial system.
  • Those who complete prison-based treatment and continue with treatment in the community have the best outcomes.
  • Alcoholism has been found to be genetically inherited in some families.
  • Hallucinogens do not always produce hallucinations.
  • Drug conspiracy laws were set up to win the war on drugs.
  • Morphine is an extremely strong pain reliever that is commonly used with terminal patients.
  • The younger you are, the more likely you are to become addicted to nicotine. If you're a teenager, your risk is especially high.
  • One oxycodone pill can cost $80 on the street, compared to $3 to $5 for a bag of heroin. As addiction intensifies, many users end up turning to heroin.
  • These days, taking pills is acceptable: there is the feeling that there is a "pill for everything".
  • Cocaine stays in one's system for 1-5 days.
  • GHB is a popular drug at teen parties and "raves".
  • Aerosols are a form of inhalants that include vegetable oil, hair spray, deodorant and spray paint.
  • Younger war veterans (ages 18-25) have a higher likelihood of succumbing to a drug or alcohol addiction.

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