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Maryland Treatment Centers

University of Maryland (Needle Exchange Treatment Program)


University of Maryland (Needle Exchange Treatment Program) in Baltimore, Maryland is a drug rehab facility focusing on substance abuse treatment services. Providing substance abuse treatment, detoxification, methadone maintenance, and methadone detox with outpatient care. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders, persons with HIV or AIDS, seniors or older adults, pregnant or postpartum women, women, men, and criminal justice clients are supported for drug treatment. Medicaid, private health insurance, and self payment is accepted with sliding fee scales and payment assistance. Includes ASL or other assistance for the hearing impaired.

Facility Location:
630 West Fayette Street, Baltimore,maryland, 21201, USA
Mailing Address:
630 West Fayette Street, Baltimore,MD, 21201, USA
Phone Number:
(410) 837-3313
Website
None
Primary Focus
Substance abuse treatment services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification
Type of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Persons with HIV/AIDS, Seniors/older adults, Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, Men, Criminal justice clients
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Private health insurance
Payment Assistance
Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)
Special Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Facility Map:


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Drug Facts


  • Nitrates are also inhalants that come in the form of leather cleaners and room deodorizers.
  • Teens who start with alcohol are more likely to try cocaine than teens who do not drink.
  • In the year 2006 a total of 13,693 people were admitted to Drug rehab or Alcohol rehab programs in Arkansas.
  • In the past 15 years, abuse of prescription drugs, including powerful opioid painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, has risen alarmingly among all ages, growing fastest among college-age adults, who lead all age groups in the misuse of medications.
  • Sniffing paint is a common form of inhalant abuse.
  • Gases can be medical products or household items or commercial products.
  • Narcotics are sometimes necessary to treat both psychological and physical ailments but the use of any narcotic can become habitual or a dependency.
  • Stimulants such as caffeine can be found in coffee, tea and most soft drinks.
  • Children who learn the dangers of drugs and alcohol early have a better chance of not getting hooked.
  • Women are at a higher risk than men for liver damage, brain damage and heart damage due to alcohol intake.
  • Rohypnol has no odor or taste so it can be put into someone's drink without being detected, which has lead to it being called the "Date Rape Drug".
  • Oxycontin is know on the street as the hillbilly heroin.
  • Drugs and alcohol do not discriminate no matter what your gender, race, age or political affiliation addiction can affect you if you let it.
  • Oxycodone stays in the system 1-10 days.
  • Smoking crack cocaine can lead to sudden death by means of a heart attack or stroke right then.
  • Out of every 100 people who try, only between 5 and 10 will actually be able to stop smoking on their own.
  • Valium is a drug that is used to manage anxiety disorders.
  • Ironically, young teens in small towns are more likely to use crystal meth than teens raised in the city.
  • Cocaine stays in one's system for 1-5 days.
  • Methamphetamine can be detected for 2-4 days in a person's system.

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