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Connecticut Treatment Centers

John Dempsey Hospital (Psychiatry Outpatient Services)


John Dempsey Hospital (Psychiatry Outpatient Services) in Farmington, Connecticut is a drug treatment program focusing on mental health services. Providing substance abuse treatment and buprenorphine used in drug treatment with outpatient care. Dual diagnosis or persons with co-occuring disorders are supported for drug rehab. Medicaid, medicare, state financed payment, private health insurance, and self payment is accepted.

Facility Location:
10 Talcott Notch Road, Farmington,connecticut, 6030, USA
Mailing Address:
10 Talcott Notch Road, Farmington,CT, 6030, USA
Phone Number:
(860) 679-6700
Intake Number:
(860) 679-6703
Website
www.uchc.edu
Primary Focus
Mental health services
Services Provided
Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services
Type of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders
Forms of Payment Accepted
Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance
Payment Assistance Available:
Not Available
Special Language Services:
Not Available

Facility Map:


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Drug Facts


  • Ecstasy causes chemical changes in the brain which affect sleep patterns, appetite and cause mood swings.
  • People who use marijuana believe it to be harmless and want it legalized.
  • Cocaine comes in two forms. One is a powder and the other is a rock. The rock form of cocaine is referred to as crack cocaine.
  • Marijuana is known as the "gateway" drug for a reason: those who use it often move on to other drugs that are even more potent and dangerous.
  • Women are at a higher risk than men for liver damage, brain damage and heart damage due to alcohol intake.
  • Veterans who fought in combat had higher risk of becoming addicted to drugs or becoming alcoholics than veterans who did not see combat.
  • Illegal drug use is declining while prescription drug abuse is rising thanks to online pharmacies and illegal selling.
  • 30,000 people may depend on over the counter drugs containing codeine, with middle-aged women most at risk, showing that "addiction to over-the-counter painkillers is becoming a serious problem.
  • Teens who start with alcohol are more likely to try cocaine than teens who do not drink.
  • Gang affiliation and drugs go hand in hand.
  • Ketamine is considered a predatory drug used in connection with sexual assault.
  • Used illicitly, stimulants can lead to delirium and paranoia.
  • Smokers who continuously smoke will always have nicotine in their system.
  • For every dollar that you spend on treatment of substance abuse in the criminal justice system, it saves society on average four dollars.
  • Drug use can interfere with the fetus' organ formation, which takes place during the first ten weeks of conception.
  • Nitrates are also inhalants that come in the form of leather cleaners and room deodorizers.
  • New scientific research has taught us that the brain doesn't finish developing until the mid-20s, especially the region that controls impulse and judgment.
  • Sniffing gasoline is a common form of abusing inhalants and can be lethal.
  • Currently 7.1 million adults, over 2 percent of the population in the U.S. are locked up or on probation; about half of those suffer from some kind of addiction to heroin, alcohol, crack, crystal meth, or some other drug but only 20 percent of those addicts actually get effective treatment as a result of their involvement with the judicial system.
  • 193,717 people were admitted to Drug rehabilitation or Alcohol rehabilitation programs in California in 2006.

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